05 5 / 2012

Barbara Smith, “Racism and Women’s Studies”, All the Women are White, all the Blacks are Men, But Some of Us Are Brave

Barbara Smith, “Racism and Women’s Studies”, All the Women are White, all the Blacks are Men, But Some of Us Are Brave

05 5 / 2012

"Women of today are still being called upon to stretch across the gap of male ignorance and to educate men as to our existence and our needs. This is an old and primary tool of all oppressors to keep the oppressed occupied with the master’s concerns. Now we hear that it is the task of women of Color to educate white women — in the face of tremendous resistance — as to our existence, our differences, our relative roles in our joint survival. This is a diversion of energies and a tragic repetition of racist patriarchal thought."

Audre Lorde, “The Master’s Tools Will Never Dismantle the Master’s House” (via mylifeasafeminista)

05 5 / 2012

"Traditionally, in american society, it is the members of oppressed, objectified groups who are expected to stretch out and bridge the gap between the actualities of our lives and the consciousness of our oppressor. For in order to survive, those of us for whom oppression is as american as apple pie have always had to be watchers, to become familiar with the language and manners of the oppressor, even sometimes adopting them for some illusion of protection. Whenever the need for some pretense of communication arises, those who profit from our oppression call upon us to share our knowledge with them. In other words, it is the responsibility of the oppressed to teach the oppressors their mistakes. I am responsible for educating teachers who dismiss my children’s culture in school. Black and Third World people are expected to educate white people as to our humanity. Women are expected to educate men. Lesbians and gay men are expected to educate the heterosexual world. The oppressors maintain their position and evade responsibility for their own actions. There is a constant drain of energy which might be better used in redefining ourselves and devising realistic scenarios for altering the present and constructing the future."

05 5 / 2012

"Those of us who stand outside the circle of this society’s definition of acceptable women; those of us who have been forged in the crucibles of difference — those of us who are poor, who are lesbians, who are Black, who are older — know that survival is not an academic skill. It is learning how to stand alone, unpopular and sometimes reviled, and how to make common cause with those others identified as outside the structures in order to define and seek a world in which we can all flourish. It is learning how to take our differences and make them strengths. For the master’s tools will never dismantle the master’s house. They may allow us temporarily to beat him at his own game, but they will never enable us to bring about genuine change. And this fact is only threatening to those women who still define the master’s house as their only source of support."

05 5 / 2012

"For women, the need and desire to nurture each other is not pathological but redemptive, and it is within that knowledge that our real power is rediscovered. It is this real connection which is so feared by a patriarchal world…Interdependency between women is the way to a freedom which allows the I to be, not in order to be used, but in order to be creative. This is a difference between the passive be and the active being."

05 5 / 2012

"The love expressed between women is particular and powerful because we have had to love in order to live; love has been our survival."

Audre Lorde (via daughterofzami)

05 5 / 2012

"Whenever a conscious Black woman raises her voice on issues central to her existence, somebody is going to call her strident, because they don’t want to hear about it, nor us. I refuse to be silenced and I refuse to be trivialized, even if I do not say what I have to say perfectly."

Audre Lorde (via daughterofzami)

05 5 / 2012

Bell Hooks, We Real Cool, p. 117.

Bell Hooks, We Real Cool, p. 117.

05 5 / 2012

The Proceedings of the International Tribunal on Crimes Against Women, Diana Russell. 1976.
(via lesbianseparatist)

The Proceedings of the International Tribunal on Crimes Against Women, Diana Russell. 1976.

(via lesbianseparatist)

05 5 / 2012

Hi mom, guess what!?
(via latinamerican-worldfeminism)

Hi mom, guess what!?

(via latinamerican-worldfeminism)

(Source: latinamerican-worldfeminist)

04 5 / 2012

"I name myself “lesbian” because this culture oppresses, silences, and destroys lesbians, even lesbians who do don’t call themselves “lesbians.” I name myself “lesbian” because I want to be visible to other black lesbians. I name myself “lesbian” because I do not subscribe to predatory/institutionalized heterosexuality. I name myself lesbian because I want to be with women (and they don’t all have to call themselves “lesbians”). I name myself “lesbian” because it is part of my vision. I name myself lesbian because being woman-identified has kept me sane. I call myself “Black,” too, because Black is my perspective, my aesthetic, my politics, my vision, my sanity."

Professor Cheryl Clarke, from “New Notes on Lesbianism” 

(via colorfuldiaspora)

04 5 / 2012

“i agree, me and my ‘brother’ both been screwed by the system, but when he starts screwin’ me he is the system and when white liberals start telling me to ‘take it but don’t shake it’ they’re the system too.”

(via girlsandgifs)

(Source: medusasseveredhead)

04 5 / 2012

"I think about my sisters in the movement. I remember the days when, draped in African garb, we rejected our foremothers and ourselves as castrators. We did penance for robbing the brother of his manhood, as if we were the oppressor. I remember the days of the Panther party when we were “moderately liberated.” When we were allowed to wear pants and expected to pick up the gun. The days when we gave doe-eyed looks to our leaders. The days when we worked like dogs and struggled desperately for the respect which they struggled desperately not to give us. I remember the black history classes that did [not] mention women and the posters of our “leaders” where women were conspicuously absent."

Assata Shakur (via feministcookingshow)

(Source: )

01 5 / 2012

01 5 / 2012

"Without (hetero)sexual abuse, (hetero)sexual harassment and the (hetero)sexualization of every aspect of female bodies and behaviors, there would not be patriarchy, and whatever other forms or materialization of oppression might exist, they would not have the shapes, boundaries and dynamics of the racism, nationalism, and so on that we are now familiar with."

Marilyn Frye, Willful Virgins: Essays In Feminism, 1976-1992 – Willful Virgins or Do You Have to Be a Lesbian to Be a Feminist?, Crossing Press, 1992